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to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that
their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens. a lot of my friends celebrated chinese new years in china and th
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> in this fabulously beautiful persidio national park and near golden gate and running like a scar is this ugly highway. that was built in 1936 at the same time as the bridge and at that time the presidio was an army and they didn't want civilians on their turf. and the road was
and behind the buildings. so one of the things that many of us here understand that the environment or what we call the climate influences outcomes but often times in public schools where decisions are made, climate and educational mandates are perceived as two opposite ends of the continuum, like when i have time and i've achieved my test scores and we've got everything buttoned up, then we'll get to the klie mallet. we've heard it from speaker after speaker, that conditions set the stage for children to leeb lean in and achieve. the good news is we can move bullying out of the front page not with more dollars but with more changes in our attitudes and our interactions. if more teachers perceive themselves to be call friendly and know the names of boys and girls in their buildings, part of it is reeducation that climate and environment and changing social norms is not secondary, it's primary and when we all embrace that then we'll begin to see the changes in the policies and the practices and we'll begin to get the results we want. we need to advocate for improving the social climates
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
punitive measures because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and
practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city w
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists who will give us their perspective. >> so we're going to do a
response at the local level, and then herding all the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no
crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact risk. i think we are probabl
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test test >> welcome to the april 10th, 2013, the preceding office is chris fong and two commissioners. to my left a district attorney city attorney and that's the controls of the boards legal assistant. we
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
of time to continue to reduce crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact r
. long paths allow you to meander, perfect for dog walking in a wooded environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for foo
that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm very sympathetic acknowledgin
, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years se
the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ ♪ welcome home, man. >> hello, everybody and welcome, good afternoon. thank you so much for coming to join us for this celebration today. i'm renell, brooks moon from the morning show, and of course, the voice of your 2012 world champions, san francisco giants. >> in fact, the last time that i was at city hall was halloween 201
are accommodating growth in a manner that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm v
businesses. our environment. we are all concerned about that as well. of course i must say about our housing authority as well. so we are taking on a lot of responsibility and because we are and because we are very busy doing the work we are. sometimes we need your input to steer us in the right direction for what things you think are important. so we are open to that. and we want to hear from you tonight. enough speeches. let's get on with it. may i have a couple words from supervisor avalos and farrell. >> thank you. thank you mayor lee, and yes, i get to make a speech too. i am supervisor john avalos, i represent district 11, just over the hill. i want to thank the mayor and the department staff for being here. and i want to thank supervisor farrell, the chair of the budget committee to be here. he's got a very difficult task. but one that he will have help with colleagues on the budget committee and we will be joined by supervisor cohen as well. i have talked incessantly of needing a budget based on equity, on neighborhoods and their needs. in district 10 and 11, we have the most unique
environment. >> i enjoy the history. the diversity of nature that exists in such an urban city, concrete streets, cars, we have this oasis of the natural environment. it reminds us of what the history was. >> there is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available on the 28 bus to get you very easily. the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. it is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll around the lake and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is a place to find and appreciate what you -- a wonderful breath of fresh air. come and experience in this park and enjoy the people, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved ones. in the middle of pacific heights, on top of these hills, it offers a great square, a peaceful beauty, large trees and grass and greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football and picnics. it is very much a couple's park. there are many activities you can experience together. stroll on the pathways, bring
of sustainability this doesn't also happen with the projects. they've taken a lot of time to benefit the environment and it will be a benefit to the neighborhood and to the neighbors with the view of their house. i really think this is a great design for a family house their maintaining what's there and they're asking for the variance to be maintained. i really support that project. thank you very much >> thank you any other public comments? please step forward >> good evening maybe i'm the last one we can all go home arrest i'm frank morris. my family as lived in this area for over 70 years. i've lived they're there for 3 seven years. tights real a shame we're here at this point. we all want our neighbors to get what they need but not as an expense to the neighborhood. first one was the variance that took the two parking spaces in their driveway sometimes there's 3 cars in that driveway. they were allowed to take the garage space and make that that an apartment. the second thing is the variance allows the building to be the highest densest on the block. i have 2 thousand square foot on exactly 4
on the environment which could result from implementation. staff is not here today to respond to comments such comments will be responded in writing which will respond to ail comments during the public comment period and this is not a hearing to disapprove or approve the project. comments today should be directed for the adequacy of the project >> commenters should state their name and address so thel they can have a copy of the projects comments. we'll take any comments from the planning commission and the public comment extended to the april 29, '96. since this is a local san francisco project this is the only draft. i recommend that the public hearing be opened. okay opening it up to public comment. tim kennedy. >> hello, i'm timmy live on 41 avenue. i'm coming here today because i'm a certified person. my prim certain is not with the underground water. my prim certain is with the pipeline location. and particle with the south sunset well location. if the eir the well, is located on 40 and the pipeline will make a 90 degree it goes up one block north and makes a 90-degree angle & the
is threatened in any way, there is some awareness they are in that environment, number one. number two, what we found are a lot of the artists in our program are of the street culture. so, they know when tags are just tagging and what's vandalism, gang related or more serious. we had one particular incident at 65 oak grover, a beautiful mural, and it was slightly obliterated. he went back and fixed it. and then they came back and completely obliterated it. and he told me he could not go back up there because the people that did that would hurt him and he knew who it was. so, instead of hiring another muralist to go up there because he gave us that information, we just had -- we buffed it over and had a blank coat of paint put over it. so, in our program we can utilize the artists to get the information we need to keep them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with this topic a little bit because i
and educating we are working with all of the kids and we want the kids to have a healthy environment when they're in school, and not only when in school but as they become a citizen and progress through their life. i am proud to being here. our office is very committed to doing this and fortunate and we got a couple of grants announced and working on restorative justice with the schools and did it with adults and this is a wonderful opportunity. thank you very much for putting this together. [applause] >> thank you. cheryl. >> great thank you. it's wonderful to be here today. i am actually wearing two hats. one i am representing for our area we have an anti-bullying campaign we launched, a two year program through the superintendent of the schools in san mateo county and also as the director of community gate paths and serves children and adults with disabilities and how i got involved with this two years ago we have a website, online social networking cite site that a lot of parents participate in to get information and professionals and networking and sharing stories with each other an
for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in californi
of making everything a process like public art would be really challenging in an environment like san francisco. so, i think every city is different. san francisco would be drastically affected if we adopted something that stringent. >> i just wanted to speak to -- a little bit to [speaker not understood] speaking about the vancouver program. and i do have some experience with that. ways also a coordinator of murals. and one of the benefits of having a process, whether that's a permit, whether there's a fee attached to that, whether there's a committee or if it simply goes through a process where different departments of the city can have input. for example, in vancouver and really the vancouver graffiti management mural program is almost identical to what tyra is talking about doing here. it's similar to public art murals, but similar in scope. when we were doing our murals, almost 200 of them, there was no permit in place, but there was a selection process. and, so, if that was the heritage property, that had to go to heritage. and they had to decide whether or not that building ha
's happening so if the artist is threatened in any way, there is some awareness they are in that environment, number one. number two, what we found are a lot of the artists in our program are of the street culture. so, they know when tags are just tagging and what's vandalism, gang related or more serious. we had one particular incident at 65 oak grover, a beautiful mural, and it was slightly obliterated. he went back and fixed it. and then they came back and completely obliterated it. and he told me he could not go back up there because the people that did that would hurt him and he knew who it was. so, instead of hiring another muralist to go up there because he gave us that information, we just had -- we buffed it over and had a blank coat of paint put over it. so, in our program we can utilize the artists to get the information we need to keep them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with
information about their subject through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt'
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we
of drivers produces an environment of teamwork. additionally there has been sefrmentd that local customers have made inquiries about the health of the drivers in san francisco. the idea has received great reviews. to the issuance of madalinas this program has produced the lease amount of - i would strongly encourage the enhancement of this program in the future >> (calling names). >> again evening board of directors. i want to thank the doctor on his report. i have a couple of concerns that were brought up on the town hall meeting. the w hotel is on the corner of third and howard. if you're coming down third on a rush hour period it's going to be about 5 tow 7 minutes because when everybody comes to that threshold of montgomery. if you look at june the 14th of that day there was a giant against the houston as atrocities which means south of marketing is a mess. so there are other drorgsz be made there. i want to thank the director for trying to get more inspectors to help with the enforcement hopeful that won't be nitpicking with a madalinas on your shoulder. it 50 should be a rent basis
own environment and house and recovery and your neighbors are doing the same the city as a whole will be a more resilient city. >> we are all proud of living in san francisco and being prepared helps us stay here. >> so, thank you so much for joining us today, alicia, i appreciate it. >> absolutely, it is my pleasure. >> and thank you for joining us on another edition of building >> hi, i'm corn field and welcome to doing building san francisco, we are doing a special series, called stay safe, how you can stay in your home safely and comfortable, and we know that an earthquake is coming and there are things that you can do to reduce the effects of the earthquake on your home. let's take a look at that. >> here at the spur urban center on mission street in san francisco talking about staying in your home after an earthquake. i have guests today, pat buscavich and his dog, harvey and david, and both structural engineers and we want to talk about things that you might do before an earthquake to your home to make it more likely that your home will be ha bitable after an earthquake, w
of the stability of the environment you're in. >> the building department will typically require that kind of information. people will do a major edition. what we are wondering is why we require that information. >> great, thank you very much. it is terrific. it is fun to see a lot of the city. thank you. [train whistle blowing] global warming. [whistle blows] some say irreversible consequences are 30 years away. 30 years? that won't affect me. [brakes screech] [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this li
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
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